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Posts tagged “chippendale

Process

I start each piece by cutting parts out of boards, or some times one board. It’s a stressful time in the process of making furniture. I have a limited amount of material and have to make the best decisions regarding grain and figure. I’ll be working on these parts for a while and when it’s finished the parts will be that way forever.




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Then there is a point where the parts start to take shape. The goal is to make each part like it was made of the same piece of wood. The grain should do the same thing in the same place on every leg, post or crest rail. It’s hard to do. You have to be sure the growth rings are facing the same way when cutting out the shapes. Things start to happen quickly at this stage.


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This is my favorite time at the shop. Joints have already been cut and can be assembled. The board starts to come back together again and look as if it is completely natural. I’m no longer making smaller boards, I’m making arms, legs, feet!


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Goodbye 2013!

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The year started off with the completion of this carved oak vanity. The hardest part might have been photographing it! It just doesn’t fit in a frame.

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From oaken vanity Welsh Dresser, here in curly maple. Probably my favorite for the year.

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An architectural model.

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Two copies of an early Queen Anne chair, with rush seats.

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And a compass seat frame. The chair was made by someone else.

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The key to Stockton!

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Take your kids to work day!

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Interior shutters.

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A child’s size rocker in walnut.

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Two Hadley trunks made of sassafras.

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A full size, Chippendale, four poster with tester.
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Wainscoting in my house.

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My son found a child size windsor rocker, so we fixed it up, it fits him perfectly.

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A walnut vitrine that I never got to photograph properly.

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A set of Red cedar Campeche chairs.

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And finally a New York Chippendale serpentine gaming table! I hereby resolve to post more this year!


Double Sided Cabinet

This is a commissioned book case that I’ve just completed. It is made of cherry, with an oil, shellac and wax finish. It was designed to divid the space between a kitchen and great room and be accessible from both sides, one side is open and the other has doors. The case is quite large, 54″ long 36″ high and 22″ deep.

The case is a good height for a serving station during parties.The shelves accommodate most art books.

Hand cut half-blind dovetails join the sides of the case which sits on a frame supported by ogee bracket feet.


Trade Signs

The first sign I made for the store was made of maple and basswood. It has a typical trade sign construction consisting of a frame with a board let into a slot cut into the top and bottom rail. The board is shaped at the top and bottom like a Chippendale looking glass frame. The sides have two different Queen Anne chair splat patterns cut out. The posts on either side are turned with different forms taken from William & Mary table legs as well as the drops at the bottoms. They are topped with flames in the styles of Philadelphia and Boston. I painted it with milk paint, a bad choice for something that lives outside.

I re-painted it a few years later with a phoenix bird in red. Taken from a finial on a famous Philadelphia chest-on-chest.

I was looking at some finial carvings from a Boston carver and was inspired to make a new sign. This one had a more eagle like beak but a wonderful long neck and tail feathers.

I carved the moulding around the frame with a water leaf pattern and gilded the Phoenix bird with gold leaf.


Round Table

If a table is to be used for eating, drinking or talking with friends, I believe it should be round. I realize that some rooms are too small, and some gatherings are too large to use a round table, but they are still the best shape for conversation.

My favorite round tables are gate-leg drop-leaf tables, meaning the top can hang down if the gate-leg is folded in. These tables can be any where from 3 feet wide to 8 feet. The large tables are usually ovoid. They commonly have turned legs like this table, but also could have straight ,tapered or cabriole legs. One of my favorites is a New York table with eight ball & claw feet.

Some folks don’t like the gate-leg because they feel like they will hit their knees, so this table was made without the folding top and legs. It is made of maple that was painted with milk paint on the base and stained on the top. It is 60 inches wide, a good size for 6 people.